Guide

In this section, the process of how a user can search a certain region is described in detail.

Step 1: Search for a country

Once you visit the application, a page that contains a search box will appear. This is a text-based search box, so the user just needs to type the first letter of the country (or the full name). It is important to notice that "Germany" is different than "germany", so the user should keep in mind to use a capital first letter.

Figure 1 Search for a country

Figure 1 Search for a country

Step 2: Search for a region

After searching for a certain country, the user will be redirected to a new page that contains another search box, with all the regions of the country the user has previously selected. The user just has to select one of these available regions.

Figure 2 Choose a region

Figure 2 Choose a region

Once the user has selected the region of interest, a new page with four different tabs will be displayed.By default, the user is redirected to the first tab that is about the Sectors with Workers in each region.

Step 3: Show the regional employment sectors

The graph in Figure 3 presents the sectors that seem to employ most of the region's population. We have chosen to display the sectors that correspond to the 75% of the total. The blue dot is the region, while the "empty" white ones correspond to each of the previously described sectors. The user can click on each of the circles to display related information. For the sectors, this information is the number of workers and the name of the sector, while for the region (blue dot) only its name is displayed on click.

Figure 3 Sectors with workers

Figure 3 Sectors with workers

Step 4: Find sectors with worker-specialization

By clicking on the Sectors with worker specialization tab the graph is updated and the user can see all the green dots (sectors with worker-specialization), together with those that do not seem to have a specialization (white ones). In order to check if a sector is "specialized" or not, we calculate the LQ. An LQ is computed as an industry’s share of a regional total for some economic statistic (earnings, GDP by metropolitan area, employment, etc.) divided by the industry’s share of the national total for the same statistic. If the LQ of a sector is beyond a certain threshold, the sector is considered to be "specialized". The additional functionalities described in the previous step, are present here as well.

Figure 4 Sectors with worker specialization

Figure 4 Sectors with worker specialization

Step 5: Show the sectors with technological specialization

In order to find the technological specialization of the region the user just needs to click on the Technological Specialization tab. The graph is updated and the sectors that appear to have a worker and a technlogical specialization, change their color to red. In our example (see Figure 5) only the "Computer Programming" sector seems to have both a worker and a technological specialization. The technological specialization can be found after a series of calculations on Patents related data.

Figure 5 Sectors with technological specialization

Figure 5 Sectors with technological specialization

Step 6: Find correlated sectors

By clicking on the Correlated Sectors tab the graph is updated once more and the user can now see all the green dots (sectors with worker-specialization),all the red dots (worker and technological specialization) together with those that do not seem to have any specialization (white ones). However, if the user double clicks on one of the red dots one or more new shapes will appear. These red squares are displayed only if this sector appears to be highly correlated with other sectors. The correlation between sectors has been already calculated by using global and european patent related data. Once the user clicks on the red squares, the name of the correlated (if any) sectors is displayed.

Figure 6 Correlated Sectors

Figure 6 Correlated Sectors

Step 7: Download the graph

By clicking on the Save as Image button on the bottom left corner the user can export the visualization above into a "PNG" image, download and save it into a local storage device.

Figure 7 Export as Image

Figure 7 Export as Image